Biohazard

Coronavirus: 21st Century Pandemic – By the Numbers

Local Pandemic Headlines

Hawaii Today – Record numbers of new daily COVID-19 cases explode previous Hawaii case counts. 

State health officials reported a record 233 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday, including 9 on Maui  and 5 new cases on Hawaii Island.  Virus death count steady at 40, statewide.

  • The Department of Health says at least 86 of Thursday’s 355 cases were linked to the Oahu Community Correctional Center.
  • The health department also reported the deaths of two Oahu men over the age of 60, bringing the state’s death toll to 40.
  • Even without the jail cases, Thursday’s numbers would be the highest recorded to date. The previous record high was 231 cases on Saturday.

Hawaii has the fastest-growing infection rate in the country, according to several statistical models.

The effective reproduction rate or Rt — also known as the infection rate — is a mathematical model for how many more people a person is predicted to spread the virus to, says Thomas Lee, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Hawaii Manoa.

“Every death reminds us how very serious this disease is,” Health Director Bruce Anderson said. “Coronavirus can strike down anyone of any age. We can all protect each other and prevent more hospitalizations and deaths.”

Lt. Gov. Josh Green said Wednesday that if the daily statewide COVID-19 case numbers continue to be in the 150-200 range in a week, he’d advise Gov. David Ige “to do the full shutdown and go back to a four-week period of stay-at-home” mandates.  “We have some of the highest transmission rates right now in the country,” he said. “And that’s a reflection of having had so few cases before. We had very little immunity.”

The Department of Health is investigating multiple coronavirus clusters — as Hawaii’s case numbers inched close to 4,000.

State health officials reported 202 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, including two on Kauai, two on Hawaii island, one on Maui and 197 on Oahu.

  • The state’s intensive care beds were at 56% capacity as of last Friday, according to Lt. Gov. Josh Green, and health officials are warning that hospitals could be overrun by the end of the month if the virus continues to spread at its current rate. At least two hospitals in the state are near capacity.

In recent weeks, we have seen a surge in COVID-19 cases statewide, including growing numbers on the Big Island. Today we saw 5 new Big Island cases, bringing Hawaii County to 22 known active cases. 3 of these individuals are currently hospitalized. Statewide, the total number of identified positive cases is 4,543, and of these 2,747 are currently active.


 

HAWAII COVID-19 IMPACT

August 13, 2020

Hi 8 13

 

 


 

 

Hawaii COVID-19 Trend Analysis as of August 12, 2020

Hi Deaths

Us Cases 8 12


  • Hawaii’s governor and mayors reevaluated plans for a projected Aug. 1 reopening, has been pushed out to September, and subject to change as conditions warrant.   

 

National Pandemic Headlines

  • Several European countries, including Greece and Spain, enacted new restrictions in an effort to contain outbreaks without having to revert to major shutdowns.

USA breaks through the 5 million mark for COVID-19 infections, but its just another day in the White House and the President, where its an absence of governance — as usual.

The U.S. reports its highest single-day virus death toll of the month.

Officials across the United States reported at least 1,470 deaths on Wednesday, the highest single-day total yet in August, according to a New York Times database, and a reflection of the continued toll of the early-summer case surge in Sun Belt states.

More than half the deaths reported on Wednesday were spread across five states that saw some of the most dramatic case spikes in June and July. Texas reported more than 300 deaths Wednesday. Florida more than 200. And Arizona, California and Georgia all reported more than 100 each.

Even as the number of new cases has fallen from its late July peak, deaths have remained persistently high. For more than two weeks, the country has averaged more than 1,000 deaths a day, more than twice as many as in early July.

 

“It’s unacceptable for the country to have testing come back a week or even two weeks later,” Tom Inglesby, director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, he said on Sunday. “It’s not useful at that point.”

  • Six months since the very first cases of Covid-19 were diagnosed in China, more than 162,000 Americans are now dead – by far the biggest toll of any nation afflicted by the raging global pandemic.
  • Democratic vice presidential pick Sen. Kamala Harris on Wednesday blamed President Donald Trump for the severity of the coronavirus outbreak in the United States.   “This virus has impacted almost every country, but there’s a reason it has hit America worse than any other advanced nation,” she said.
  • “His refusal to get testing up and running, his flip-flopping on social distancing and wearing masks, his delusional belief that he knows better than the experts — all of that is the reason and the reason an American dies of Covid-19 every 80 seconds,” she said.
  • When other countries are following the science, Trump pushed miracle cures he saw on Fox,” Harris said. “While other countries were flattening the curve, he said the virus would just, poof, go away, quote ‘like a miracle.’ So when other countries opened back up for business, what did we do? We had to shut down again.”
The U.S. has the worst coronavirus outbreak in the world with more than 5 million cases and at least 165,328 deaths as of Wednesday, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

 

BeyondKona continues to monitor and report on the COVID-19 pandemic, sourcing information from the most reliable and available data sources. 


COVID-19 Impact on the United States

 August 14, 2020

 

  • COVID 19 Case Total exceeds 5.3 million and climbing / U.S. Deaths are now nearing 170,000 (169,131), as of August 12th, 2020, according to the Worldometer data tracker,  The number — far higher than any other nation’s — exceeded the number of U.S. lives lost to the Korean War, the Vietnam War and the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks combined.

 

 

Us Deaths 8 12

 

Us Cases 8 12

 



GLOBAL COVID-19 IMPACT 

 August 14, 2020

 

Global Case Graph 8 1

The cumulative total of Covid-19 cases confirmed since the start of the outbreak worldwide breaks 20 million, with an average over 10,000 new virus-related deaths per day.

  • 20,021,321 Cases WORLDWIDE (up-to-date)
  •  733,918 Deaths WORLDWIDE (USA continues to lead the world in virus deaths)
  • 12,896,895 Recoveries WORLDWIDE  Global Stat Graph

The earliest known case of the novel coronavirus dates back to Nov. 17, 2019, when a 55-year-old individual from Hubei province in China contracted the virus.  Recent evidence indicates the COVID-19 virus that taken a serious toll of New York lives originated from Europe, not China as previously thought.

That’s 10 times more worldwide than the globe reported just a month ago. As of today (April 2), the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has spread to 204 countries and regions, according to Worldometer, which relies on multiple data sources to track the virus spread. For more data detail we recommend visiting: https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/



/////////////////////////// PANDEMIC ARCHIVE NEWS SECTION //////////////////////////////////////////////


Pandemic News Archive : Hawaii

  •  All travelers — visitors as well as residents — will not be able to bypass quarantine with a negative test result until September or later. With COVID-19 cases surging in key Hawaii travel markets and supplies of COVID-19 testing material under stress, Gov. David Ige on Monday said he would push back until at least Sept. 1, the present planned date for opening Hawaii to travelers from outside the state.
  • A major Hawaii laboratory that has conducted a large portion of COVID-19 diagnostic tests in the islands has suffered a major blow to its testing supply chain, which could cause significant delays in test result turnaround times.
  • The surge in COVID-19 cases in other U.S. states has cut Diagnostic Laboratory Services off from chemical reagents from its primary vendor, Roche Diagnostics.The reagents are used for the laboratory’s fastest molecular-based testing machines, said Mark Wasielewski, president of DLS. Reagents are chemicals used to test patient swab samples.

 

  • Hawaii’s Gov. Ige; “We are now ready to begin the process to return our economy in a safe and healthy way.” 

All incoming trans-Pacific travelers who wish to opt out of Hawaii’s 14-day quarantine will need to show proof that they had a negative molecular-based COVID-19 test result within 72 hours of their travel, Gov. David Ige announced  at a press conference Wednesday at the Daniel K. Inouye Airport.  

The new rules go into effect August 1

  • Bank of Hawaii released its May survey results entitled “COVID-19 in Hawaii: Facts and Insights.”  The survey of 1,096 Hawaii residents statewide was conducted May 14 to 22.

Peter Ho, CEO of Bank of Hawaii, said of the report… “The research findings illustrate just how much the pandemic has exacerbated hardships for residents. Many are adding to their existing credit card debt or selling personal items to make ends meet”.

– Hawaii Struggles with Reduced Tourist Dollars

  • Gov. David Ige said at a press conference Monday that during the prior fiscal year, the state collected $7 billion in taxes, and in the fiscal year that ended June 30, it collected $6.5 billion, a 7% decrease.

“But all of you know that we were running along very fine, through the end of the year on record pace,” Ige said. “January, February, March, the revenues had no impact from this COVID pandemic, and then we saw the degradation in April, May and now finally June. So we do know that COVID-19 will have a significant impact on the state’s finances. So we went from a record year to a significant loss in the matter of three months.”

State tax revenues were down about 25% in June compared to the same month last year, from $644 million to $483 million. Revenue projections anticipate a tax revenue shortfall of $2.3 billion in the next 12-15 months.

As a result of a mandatory 14-day quarantine for incoming visitors, Ige said more than 200,000 Hawaii residents have lost their jobs and sought unemployment benefits.

“You probably know someone … who is facing challenging financial times, and as difficult as it has been, we haven’t felt the full financial pain yet,” Ige said.

Some $4 billion in federal funds has kept state finances afloat during the COVID-19 pandemic, but Ige said that money is drying up.

  • The Hawaii Bank survey revealed many drastic financial-pandemic effects on Hawaii’s households:
    • 45% say they have lost income.
    • 1 in 4 are delinquent on some of their bills.
    • 1 in 5 have had “issues with food security,” while 13% have sought food from a food drive or food bank.
    • 81% worry about contracting COVID-19 and 71% consider the coronavirus a threat to themselves or others living with them.
    • 83% received or expect to receive an economic impact payment.
  • The survey also found that 81% of respondents said they found the federal stimulus payments to be valuable; 49% found them to be very valuable.

– SBA Loans

  • Data released Monday by the Small Business Administration shows that businesses owned by members of Congress and the law practice that represented President Trump were among the hundreds of thousands of firms that received aid from the agency.
As part of its $660 billion small-business relief program, the SBA also handed out loans to private schools catering to elite clientele, firms owned by foreign companies and large chains backed by well-heeled Wall Street firms. Nearly 90,000 companies in the program took the aid without promising on their applications they would rehire workers or create jobs.
The data, which was released after weeks of pressure from media outlets and lawmakers, paints a picture of a haphazard first-come, first-served program that was not designed to evaluate the relative need of the recipients. While it buttressed a swath of industries and entities, including restaurants, medical offices, car dealerships, law firms and nonprofits, the agency did not filter out companies that have potential conflicts of interest among influential Washington figures.

Pandemic Archive : National

  • Study of 17 Million Identifies Crucial Risk Factors for Coronavirus Deaths

    The largest study yet confirms that race, ethnicity, age and sex can raise a person’s chances of dying from Covid-19.

    An analysis of more than 17 million people in England — the largest study of its kind, according to its authors — has pinpointed a bevy of factors that can raise a person’s chances of dying from Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

    The paper, published Wednesday in Nature, echoes reports from other countries that identify older people, men, racial and ethnic minorities, and those with underlying health conditions among the more vulnerable populations.

    The research also revealed that patients older than 80 were at least 20 times more likely to die from Covid-19 than those in their 50s, and hundreds of times more likely to die than those below the age of 40.

    Medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, severe asthma and compromised immunity were also linked to poor outcomes, in keeping with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. And the researchers noted that a person’s chances of dying also tended to track with socioeconomic factors like poverty, which is particularly bad news for Hawaii’s large low-income population.

  • The Trump administration has given formal notice that it will withdraw the United States from the World Health Organization, which is part of the United Nations, according to The New York Times. By law, the U.S. must give WHO a year’s notice before withdrawing, and officials said the notice would take effect July 6, 2021. The U.S. is the largest funder of WHO, responsible for $426 million a year in the 2018-2019 budget period, Live Science reported. Many public health experts, as well as politicians, denounced the move. In a statement, Elizabeth Cousens, president of the United Nations Foundation (a private organization that promotes UN interests), called the move “short-sighted, unnecessary, and unequivocally dangerous.”

States Mandate Masks, and begin to shut down again as coronavirus cases soar nationally and hospitalizations and deaths rise

  • The pandemic map of the United States burned bright red Monday, with the number of new coronavirus infections during the first six days of July nearing 300,000 as more states and cities moved to reimpose shutdown orders.
  • The United States is “still knee deep in the first wave” of the pandemic, Anthony S. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said Monday.
  • Fauci noted that while Europe managed to drive infections down — and now is dealing with little blips as it reopens — U.S. communities “never came down to baseline and now are surging back up,” he said in an interview conducted on Twitter and Facebook with his boss, National Institutes of Health Director Francis Collins.
  • Despite the steep new rise in infections, the House and Senate have adjourned for a two-week recess, setting up a potential battle when they return over another pandemic relief package.
    • US COVID 19 Case Total Accelerate, now exceeds 3 Million / US deaths reach 135,822
    • U.S. Cases Are Probably 10 Times Higher Than the Official Count, C.D.C. Says.
    • Seven-day average case total in the U.S. sets record for 29th straight day
  • More than 200 scientists from over 30 countries are urging the World Health Organization to take more seriously the possibility of the airborne spread of the novel coronavirus as case numbers rise around the world and surge in the United States.
  • There is growing evidence that the virus can spread indoors through aerosols that linger in the air and can be infectious even in smaller quantities than previously thought.

Asymptomatic COVID-19 Cases – Dangerous and the Source of Super-Spreader Outbreaks 

  • Conventional wisdom suggests that when a sickness is mild, it’s not too much to worry about. But if you’re taking comfort in World Health Organization reports that over 80% of global Covid-19 cases are mild or asymptomatic, think again. As virologists race to understand the biomechanics of Sars-CoV-2, one thing is becoming increasingly clear: even “mild” cases can be more complicated, dangerous and harder to shake than many first thought.

According to Dr Christopher Kellner, a professor of neurosurgery at Mount Sinai hospital in New York, “mild” cases of Covid-19 in which the patient was not hospitalized for the virus have been linked to blood clotting and severe strokes in people as young as 30.

At this stage, when medical professionals and the public alike are learning about Covid-19 as the pandemic unfolds, it’s important to keep in mind how little we truly know about this vastly complicated disease – and to listen to the experiences of survivors, especially those whose recoveries have been neither quick nor straightforward.


Pandemic Archive : Global 

  • California governor Gavin Newsom has bowed to the inevitable and ordered a dramatic rollback of the state’s reopening amid the resurgence in coronavirus infections. Bars are to close across the nation’s most populous state, while restaurants, cinemas and museums must cease any indoor operations.
  • Florida is the worst hit region in the US, mostly a by-product of the state’s flawed response to the pandemic.
  • As of last week, the worst per capita outbreak on the planet was in Arizona, followed by Florida.

  • Health-care workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic are encountering shortages of masks, gowns, face shields and gloves — a frustrating recurrence of a struggle that haunted the first months of the crisis.
Nurses say they are reusing N95 masks for days and even weeks at a time. Doctors say they can’t reopen offices because they lack personal protective equipment. State officials say they have scoured U.S. and international suppliers for PPE and struggle to get orders filled. Experts worry the problem could worsen as coronavirus infections climb, straining medical systems.

  • Over the past five days, the United States has suffered a worsening resurgence of coronavirus cases indicating that — after six months — the most powerful country in the world has made little progress in controlling the virus.
  • President Trump has increasingly sidestepped responsibility for leading a coordinated federal response.That behavior fits a pattern in Trump’s presidency in which the president seemingly has no interest in or patience for what he considers the boring work of governing, several of his former senior advisers say, speaking on the condition of anonymity.

He has not fully engaged for the hard work of defusing the pandemic, including listening to panels of experts, sifting through scientific models and making hard choices to craft a whole-of-government response, an option not seriously considered.

  • As our country plunges into a black hole of unchecked illness, death and pariahdom, the administration is waging a PR war on its own top disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, trying to convince news outlets that he can’t be trusted. The move to treat Dr. Fauci as if he were a warring political rival comes as he has grown increasingly vocal in his concerns about the national surge in coronavirus cases.

In the past five days, as the news has grown more dire and Fauci has refused to sugarcoat it, Trump and his allies have sought to cast Fauci as error-prone.

  • Dr. Anthony Fauci is America’s top immunologist who has served as the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases since 1984.

President Trump, meanwhile, has been largely MIA on a question most citizens expect their president to address: What does he plan to do now to better protect the public health and return the country to normalcy?  The president’s plan – attack the nation’s most respect and qualified infectious disease for political purposes.

On Monday, president Trump once again sought to downplay the outbreak and erroneously blame extra testing for high numbers of cases, adding that the US was doing a “great job”, while Fauci, in an online talk with a Stanford University expert, said: “We have let the local public health infrastructure in our country really go into tatters.”

  • Trump has also undercut the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, retweeting the conspiratorial ramblings of the former game show host Chuck Woolery: “The most outrageous lies are the ones about Covid-19. Everyone is lying. The C.D.C., media, Democrats, our doctors, not all but most, that we are told to trust.”

There are now so many stories of Trump followers dying after blithely exposing themselves and others to the virus.


International Developments

If you’re lucky enough to live in New Zealand, the coronavirus nightmare has been mostly over since June. After more than two weeks with no new cases, the government lifted almost all restrictions that month. The borders are still shut, but inside the country, normal life returned.

It’s coming back elsewhere too. Taiwan, where most days this month no new cases have been reported, just held the Taipei Film Festival, and a recent baseball game drew 10,000 spectators. Italy was once the epicenter of Europe’s outbreak and remains in a state of emergency, but with just a few hundred new cases a day in the whole country, bars are open and tourists have started returning, though of course Americans remain banned.

There were 321 new COVID-19 cases in all of Canada last Friday — and America, 68,241.

The world is closed to Americans; only a few dozen nations will let us in.

Lawrence O. Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown, predicts that American life will not return to normal before summer 2022. Two years of our lives, stolen by Donald Trump and his administration’s Absence of Governance.

  • Global case count exceeds 13 million infected. Death toll exceeds 1/2 million.
  • China raised its emergency warning to its second-highest level and canceled more than 60% of the flights to Beijing on Wednesday amid a new coronavirus outbreak in the capital. It was a sharp pullback for the nation that declared victory over COVID-19 in March and a message to the rest of the world about how tenacious the virus really is.
  • New infections spiked in India, Iran and U.S. states including Florida, Texas and Arizona as authorities struggled to balance restarting economic activity without accelerating the pandemic.  European nations, which embarked on a wide-scale reopening this week, looked on with trepidation as the Americas struggled to contain the first wave of the pandemic and Asian nations like China and South Korea reported new outbreaks. Chinese officials described the situation in Beijing as “extremely grave.” 

 

  • Study of 17 Million Identifies Crucial Risk Factors for Coronavirus Deaths

The largest study yet confirms that race, ethnicity, age and sex can raise a person’s chances of dying from Covid-19.An analysis of more than 17 million people in England — the largest study of its kind, according to its authors — has pinpointed a bevy of factors that can raise a person’s chances of dying from Covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

The paper, published Wednesday in Nature, echoes reports from other countries that identify older people, men, racial and ethnic minorities, and those with underlying health conditions among the more vulnerable populations.The research also revealed that patients older than 80 were at least 20 times more likely to die from Covid-19 than those in their 50s, and hundreds of times more likely to die than those below the age of 40.

Medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, severe asthma and compromised immunity were also linked to poor outcomes, in keeping with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States. And the researchers noted that a person’s chances of dying also tended to track with socioeconomic factors like poverty, which is particularly bad news for Hawaii’s large low-income population.


Recent COVID-19 Medical Discoveries

Researchers say further study is needed but those with the chronic respiratory disease don’t appear to be at a higher risk of getting extremely ill or dying from coronavirus.

“However, people with asthma—even those with diminished lung function who are being treated to manage asthmatic inflammation—seem to be no worse affected by SARS-CoV-2 than a nonasthmatic person. There is limited data as to why this is the case—if it is physiological or a result of the treatment to manage the inflammation.”

Inhaled corticosteroids, which are commonly used to protect against asthma attacks, also may reduce the virus’ ability to establish an infection.

  • Common Drug Reduces Coronavirus Deaths, Scientists Report

A steroid, dexamethasone, is the first drug shown to help save severely ill coronavirus patients, according to scientists in Britain.

“It will be great news if dexamethasone, a cheap steroid, really does cut deaths by ⅓ in ventilated patients with COVID-19,” Dr. Atul Gawande wrote on Twitter, “but after all the retractions and walk backs, it is unacceptable to tout study results by press release without releasing the paper.”  “Dexamethasone is the first drug to be shown to improve survival in Covid-19,” one of the trial’s chief investigators, Peter Horby, a professor of emerging infectious diseases at the University of Oxford, said in a statement. “The survival benefit is clear and large in those patients who are sick enough to require oxygen treatment.”

  • There is no vaccine against the coronavirus, and the only treatment known to be effective, an antiviral drug called remdesivir, only shortens the time to recovery.


The United States in focus — 

For Americans, the coronavirus went from being a mysterious affliction that occurred in far-off lands to 1 million confirmed cases on US soil within 14 weeks. Now, just six weeks later, the US has broken through the grim milestone exceeds 3 million positive tests for Covid-19, according to the Johns Hopkins University.

Deficiencies in the stockpile of testing kits, swabs, ventilators and protective equipment for medical staff marked the opening stanza of the pandemic in the US. It was a muddled and sometimes astonishing response embodied by Donald Trump, who predicted the virus would vanish in the April sunshine, squabbled with state governors and pondered the merits of injecting bleach or taking hydroxychloroquine, an unproven anti-malarial drug, since withdrawn from test use by FDA and CDC directives after proven patient-risky and ineffective.

“From the beginning there have been misrepresentations and fabrications from the White House,” said Irwin Redlener, Director, National Center for Disaster Preparedness at Columbia University. “Whatever the opposite of ‘mission accomplished’ is, that’s what this is. It’s essentially been an American fiasco.”

Dr Anthony Fauci, the administration’s top infectious disease expert, has admitted not seeing the president in weeks despite the ongoing public health crisis. “Where is it going to end? We’re still at the beginning of it,” Fauci said this week.

Yet even as the US has surged past 132,500 deaths from Covid-19, about a quarter of the entire global total, the crisis has faded from the political agenda.

With more than 40 million people already out of work in the US amid an economic downturn that may rival anything seen in the past century, any escalation of lockdown to stop the spread of the virus will risk unbearable mental and financial pain. On the other extreme, attempting to revert to previous patterns of life without a vaccine would likely overwhelm hospitals with the sick and dying.  “We need to really thread the needle between those two things,” said Redlener. “I worry we have passed over having that difficult conversation. We’ve already decided that it’s over and done with. It’s not.”

  • Trump White House declaring the mission accomplished in slowing the spread of the coronavirus, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert is sounding a more cautious note.

“We are seeing infections to a greater degree than they had previously seen in certain states, including states in the southwest and in the south,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said on Tuesday said. “I don’t like to talk about a second wave right now, because we haven’t gotten out of our first wave.” 

The federal government’s leadership in the coronavirus crisis has so faded that state and local health officials have been left to figure out on their own how to handle rising infections and to navigate conflicting signals from the White House.

About 800 Americans a day are still dying of Covid-19, a pace that, if sustained over the next few months, would yield more than 200,000 dead by the end of September. Arizona, Florida, Nevada, Oregon and Texas all reported their largest one-day increases in new cases on Tuesday, June 16th.


Hawaii’s Gov. Ige in late June, declared;“We are now ready to begin the process to return our economy in a safe and healthy way.” 

Hi Reopensweb1_0729-hawaii-state-seal | West Hawaii Today

  • All incoming trans-Pacific travelers who wish to opt out of Hawaii’s 14-day quarantine will need to show proof that they had a negative molecular-based COVID-19 test result within 72 hours of their travel, Gov. David Ige announced  at a press conference Wednesday at the Daniel K. Inouye Airport.  

The new rules go into effect August 1

Through July 2020, Governor Ige, previously declared a statewide COVID-19 restriction defined as “Act with Care”.

Act with care” is the new watchword for Hawai‘i’s current phase — reopening the “kamaʻāina economy.”  This phase depends on venues taking steps to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and Hawai‘i’s people “acting with care” to protect themselves and others by wearing face coverings and maintaining physical distancing. Now, more than ever, our safety depends on us working together to protect each other and supporting key public health strategies.

COVID-19 Q&A with Governor Ige — 

Q. Why is the timing right for reopening the economy, and with the reopening, what are your biggest concerns?

A. We’ve always said we would base our decisions on data and the best science to allow us to reopen. Clearly, our low COVID-19 case numbers show we’ve contained the virus and are able to manage any clusters, without overwhelming our healthcare system. My biggest concern is that people become complacent. We continue to emphasize that this is the new normal so everyone has to wear their masks, practice physical distancing  and limit their interactions to keep from infecting others.

Hawaii County re-opened, partly — Hawaii Island given go-ahead for selective re-opening of  churches, restaurants, and salons, effective June 1, 2020. Inter-Island flights have resumed as of June 16th, 2020.


Symptoms

3 replies
  1. Josephine Keliipio
    Josephine Keliipio says:

    Notice how CDC has no advice about taking natural remedies?
    No advice about protecting your immune system?
    And what about those who have recovered from it? No news either!.

    Reply

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